Jordi Casamitjana leaves an Employment Tribunal in Norwich after it ruled that ethical veganism is a philosophical belief and is therefore protected by law.

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PA Media

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Mr Casamitjana describes himself as an ethical vegan and campaigns to get his message to others

Ethical veganism is a “philosophical belief” and so is protected in law, a tribunal has ruled for the first time.

The case was brought by vegan Jordi Casamitjana, who claims he was sacked by the League Against Cruel Sports because of his ethical veganism.

His former employer says he was dismissed for gross misconduct.

The judge ruled ethical veganism should fall under the Equality Act 2010 but is yet to rule on Mr Casamitjana’s dismissal.

Mr Casamitjana, 55, who lives in London, said he was “extremely happy” with the ruling – which is ongoing – adding that he hopes fellow vegans “will benefit”.

The tribunal centres on his claim that he was sacked by the animal welfare charity League Against Cruel Sports after disclosing it invested pension funds in firms involved in animal testing.

Mr Casamitjana says when he drew his bosses’ attention to the pension fund investments, they did nothing so he informed colleagues and was sacked as a result.

The League Against Cruel Sports says it is “factually wrong” to link Mr Casamitjana’s dismissal to his veganism. The charity did not contest that ethical veganism should be protected.

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All vegans eat a plant-based diet, but ethical vegans try to exclude all forms of animal exploitation.

For instance they avoid wearing or buying clothing made from wool or leather, or toiletries from companies that carry out animal testing.

The tribunal’s ruling means ethical vegans are entitled to protection from discrimination.

“Religion or belief” is one of nine “protected characteristics” covered by the Equality Act 2010.

The judge Robin Postle ruled that ethical veganism qualifies as a philosophical belief, after satisfying several tests – including that it is worthy of respect in a democratic society, not incompatible with human dignity and not conflicting with the fundamental rights of others.

At the tribunal in Norwich on Friday, the judge said in his ruling that ethical veganism was “important” and “worthy” of respect in a democratic society.

He said: “I am satisfied overwhelmingly that ethical veganism does constitute a philosophical belief.”

Analysis: Far-reaching effects

By BBC legal correspondent Clive Coleman

Though a ruling from an employment tribunal does not amount to binding legal precedent, this one will have important and far-reaching effects.

Employers will have to respect ethical veganism and make sure they do not discriminate against employees for their beliefs.

So, for example, could a worker on a supermarket checkout refuse to put a meat product through the till?

The implications are considerable, not least because the legal protection will apply beyond employment, in areas such as education and the supply of goods and services.

It could also encourage others to seek similar protection for their philosophical beliefs.

I would be surprised, for instance, if there is not a challenge brought by someone who claims they have been discriminated against for their beliefs on climate change.

Refusing to travel on work business by car rather than a less carbon heavy alternative, the train?

Speaking to the BBC outside the tribunal, Mr Casamitjana said he was “extremely happy”.

“I’m really, really satisfied and I hope all the vegans out there that have been supporting me – there have been many helping me in my crowdfunding – I hope they now feel their little donation has been properly used and all the vegans will benefit.”

He added: “Veganism is a philosophical belief and when you look at my life and anybody else’s life who is an ethical vegan, you will see it.

“This is a positive belief, it’s not a negative belief. And therefore a positive belief is bound to be protected.”

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Jaysee Costa

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Mr Casamitjana supports a range of ethical and animal rights causes

He added that he is “passionate” about veganism, which “gives you hope”. Mr Casamitjana also said he was feeling “optimistic” for the ruling on his dismissal – which is due later.

Mr Casamitjana describes himself as an ethical vegan and campaigns to get his message to others.

His beliefs affect much of his everyday life. He will, for instance, walk rather than take a bus to avoid accidental crashes with insects or birds.

Peter Daly, the solicitor for Mr Casamitjana, said the ramifications of this judgement for companies that employ vegan staff are “potentially significant”.

He said any abuse directed at ethical vegans “might be seen to be harassment in the same way a racist or sexist slur might be discriminatory action”.

Rhys Wyborn, acting for the League Against Cruel Sports, said: “Although an interesting point of law, this hearing was preparation for the real crux of the matter: why Jordi Casamitjana was dismissed.

“In view of its animal welfare value, the League did not contest the issue of whether ethical veganism itself should be a protected belief, with the League maintaining that it’s irrelevant to the core reason for the dismissal.”

The tribunal will now consider whether Mr Casamitjana was treated less favourably because of his ethical veganism belief.

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